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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Wilmington College Responds to COVID-19

Easily find the answers to common questions regarding the College’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic below. If after careful review, you find that your question has not been answered, please submit it to askwc@wilmington.edu.


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Branch Campus (Cincinnati) | Commencement/Graduation | DeadlineEmployees | Exemptions | Financial Impact | Flu Shot | Guests & Events | Immunity | Masks | Natural Antibodies | Online | Other | Policy | Prevention | Seniors | Shutdown | Side Effects & Fertility | Statistics | Testing | Tuition | Vaccine

Most Common Questions

Why is Wilmington College requiring vaccination?
The Delta variant of the COVID-19 virus has contributed to an increase in cases across the country, Ohio, Clinton County, and on our campus. As of the week of September 13, 2021, we have had 31 students and 7 employees test positive this semester, with others in isolation or quarantine (see COVID-19 Dashboard for current data). Last year at this same time we only had 2 students and 1 employee test positive. Additionally, the vaccine rate among our campus community is below where we hoped to be at this point (Faculty 88% | Staff 72% | Students 35%). Clinton County’s vaccine rate is 42%. Our goal moving forward is for our campus to be fully vaccinated by the Spring 2022 semester to support the health and safety of all.

There is significant evidence that the COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. The FDA granted full approval for the Pfizer vaccine and other vaccines are seeing similar progress. These vaccines can help prevent COVID-19 and prevent severe illness or death.

On September 9, 2021, the federal government issued a mandate for all employers, including private colleges and universities, with over 100 employees to either mandate the COVID-19 vaccine or have weekly testing. Wilmington College already requires a number of other FDA-approved vaccinations for students in order to enroll.

Taking all factors into consideration, including input from the Clinton County Health Department, President Trevor announced that Wilmington College will be requiring all students, faculty (including adjunct), and staff to be fully vaccinated or have an approved exemption prior to the start of the Spring 2022 Semester.

What is the deadline for getting vaccinated?

  • Students must show proof of vaccination or obtain an approved exemption no later than December 22, 2021.
  • Faculty and staff must show proof of vaccination or obtain an approved exemption no later than December 14, 2021.

Exceptions to these deadlines may be granted if a student or employee tests positive for COVID-19 and is unable to obtain the vaccine by these dates. Please contact the Office of Student Affairs or Human Resources for further information.

What are the alternatives for those who do not wish to be vaccinated?
You may apply for a medical or religious exemption by completing the Vaccine Exemption Request Form.

How do I apply for a medical or religious exemption?
Complete the Vaccine Exemption Request Form. Students will submit the form to the Office of Student Affairs and employees will submit the form to Human Resources.

Will tuition rise as a result of this policy?
No, the current tuition rates for Spring 2022 are already set and will not be changed.

BRANCH CAMPUS (CINCINNATI)

QUESTION: If I am a fully online branch campus (Cincinnati) student, am I still required to get vaccinated?

ANSWER:

Yes, the vaccine protocol applies to all enrolled students. Branch students do have access to campus and do come to campus from time-to-time during the academic year.

COMMENCEMENT/Graduation

QUESTION: If I am graduating in December 2021, do I need to be vaccinated to walk at Commencement/Graduation in May 2022?

ANSWER:
No, you will not be an enrolled student in Spring 2022, so you will be a visitor to campus for Commencement. You will follow the guest policy, which currently requires facial coverings inside buildings and social distancing.

DEADLINE

QUESTION: What is the deadline for getting vaccinated?

ANSWER:

  • Students must show proof of vaccination or obtain an approved exemption no later than December 22, 2021.
  • Faculty and staff must show proof of vaccination or obtain an approved exemption no later than December 14, 2021.

Exceptions to these deadlines may be granted if a student or employee tests positive for COVID-19 and is unable to obtain the vaccine by these dates. Please contact the Office of Student Affairs or Human Resources for further information.


 

QUESTION: Why mandate the vaccine at this point in the school year?

ANSWER:

The decision on the vaccine protocol was only recently made (in Sept. 2021). Had Wilmington College made the decision at the beginning of the Fall Semester, this would have been communicated. At the beginning of the 2021-2022 academic year, President Trevor shared with campus the current protocols and indicated we would be reviewing our protocols monthly to determine if any modifications needed to be made. All enrolled students, faculty and staff must be fully vaccinated or have an approved exemption for the Spring 2022 semester. We are notifying campus at this time to allow for those who are unvaccinated to obtain the vaccine for spring.


 

QUESTION: I recall the vaccination deadline being around Dec. 22, 2021, but, Jan. 2022 was also mentioned. Did I misread the previous notice or has it been changed?

ANSWER:

  • Students must show proof of vaccination or obtain an approved exemption no later than December 22, 2021.
  • Faculty and staff must show proof of vaccination or obtain an approved exemption no later than December 14, 2021.

Exceptions to these dates may be granted if a student or employee tests positive for COVID-19 and is unable to obtain the vaccine by these dates. Please contact the Office of Student Affairs or  Human Resources for further information.


 

QUESTION: I have recently recovered from COVID-19, and should therefore have natural antibodies in my system. Will I still be expected to meet the deadline date this semester or will I have a deadline extension?

ANSWER:

Yes, the CDC advises the vaccine regardless of whether someone has already had COVID-19. Studies have shown that any immunity has waned after 90 days. Those that have had COVID-19 and the vaccine are the best protected. In addition, those that were treated with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma should wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccination. Please contact Student Health Services or Human Resources if this applies to you and may impact your ability to be in compliance by the deadline.

EMPLOYEES

QUESTION: Will those who choose not to receive the vaccine simply be fired?

ANSWER:
We certainly value all of the faculty and staff here at Wilmington College and want everyone to make the decision that is best for them. All faculty and staff will be required to be vaccinated or have an approved exemption by the Spring 2022 semester.

 

EXEMPTIONS

QUESTION: Are there any exemptions from the vaccination requirement?

ANSWER:

Students, faculty and staff may request a medical or religious exemption from the vaccination requirement.  Exemption requests will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.  To request an exemption, complete the Vaccination Accommodation Request Form and submit as follows:


 

QUESTION: Why is the College only offering religious exemption even though philosophical exemptions are provided in Ohio law (per Ohio revised code 3313.671, state exemptions for religious and philosophical beliefs for vaccinations)?

ANSWER:

ORC 3313.671 pertains to K-12 schools.


 

QUESTION: How does the College determine what is an acceptable religious exemption? My belief is my belief. The exemption would either have to be accepted or you are telling me my belief is wrong. What am I missing?

ANSWER:

Exemption requests will be reviewed to ensure that the request is religious in nature and not based on anything that is not religious. The individual does not need to belong to an organized religion.


 

QUESTION: Why isn’t the College considering other options such as those offered at OSU?

We are required to offer religious and medical exemption options. OSU, being a public institution, has other requirements.


 

QUESTION: Doesn’t asking for documentation for religious exemptions go against Quaker beliefs?

ANSWER:

The exemption request form indicates additional documentation for religious exemptions is “if applicable” and is therefore not required.


 

QUESTION: Who is making the decision on exemptions?

ANSWER:

The student exemptions are being reviewed by the Office of Student Affairs and employee exemptions are being reviewed by Human Resources. The College’s legal counsel will be included in cases that need further review.


 

QUESTION: Is part of a religious exemption whether the religion itself has a clearly defined and documented stance against vaccinations?

ANSWER:

No, it is based on a personal, sincerely held religious belief.


 

QUESTION: Are there any additional requirements for those that receive an exemption from the vaccination requirement?

ANSWER:

Individuals with an approved exemption will be required to be tested on a weekly basis.


 

QUESTION: When will decisions on exemption requests be made and who will make them?

ANSWER:

Completed exemption request forms will be reviewed as quickly as possible and processed by the Office of Human Resources for employees and by the Office of Student Affairs for students.


 

QUESTION: How many exemptions in total will be accepted or is there a limit?

ANSWER:

There are no restrictions on the number of employees or students who can submit exemption requests.


 

QUESTION: Will there be a personal or philosophical option to not get the vaccine?

ANSWER:

The College is offering medical and religious exemption options for employees and students at this time.


 

QUESTION: If accepted for an exemption, will I be expected to submit a new request each year?

ANSWER:

No, once an exemption has been approved it does not need to be requested again.


 

QUESTION: How does the College plan to determine exemptions without discrimination toward religious beliefs?

ANSWER:

We will be evaluating religious exemptions based on:

  • Is the religious belief sincerely held?
  • Is it, in fact, a religious belief?
  • Is there an undue burden imposed on the College for accommodating the belief?

Financial IMPACT

QUESTION: What consideration has been given to the financial impact on Wilmington College resulting from the potential loss of a significant portion of the student body due to requiring the vaccine?

ANSWER:

Our primary focus is the safety and well-being of our students, faculty and staff.  We cannot place a financial value on this.


 

QUESTION: How much money is the government giving to schools that require vaccinations?

ANSWER:

The College is not receiving any funds to have a vaccine requirement.


 

QUESTION: Where will the extra money come from to keep supporting the College? Are you cutting sports or other programs?

ANSWER:

This conversation is not about money and there have been no conversations about money in anything we have discussed.  Money is not a part of the conversation surrounding keeping the community safe.

Flu Shot

QUESTION: Is the flu shot going to be required now too?

ANSWER:

Not at this time. Compared to influenza, COVID-19 can cause more serious illnesses and spreads more easily.

GUESTS & EVENTS

QUESTION: Will prospective students touring/visiting campus be expected to show proof of vaccination since this campus is limited to vaccinated students and employees only?

ANSWER:

No, prospective students and families will follow the guest policy which requires facial coverings inside buildings and social distancing.


 

QUESTION: Will sporting events be limited to only vaccinated people (including parents, grandparents, etc.)?

ANSWER:

No, we will still allow guests and spectators at sporting events, following our current indoor guidelines.


 

QUESTION: If the President is concerned about rising cases, why were the large outdoor gatherings held (e.g. Homecoming)?

ANSWER:

All Homecoming activities were moved to outside areas to allow for social distancing and larger areas. Some activities were cancelled completely. Current CDC guidelines allow for outdoor activities.

Immunity

QUESTION: If I have already had COVID-19 and recovered, do I still need to get a COVID-19 vaccine?

ANSWER:

Yes, the CDC advises the vaccine regardless of whether someone has already had COVID-19. Studies have shown that any immunity has waned after 90 days. Those who have had COVID-19 and received the vaccine are the best protected. In addition, those that were treated with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma should wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccination. Please contact Student Health Services or Human Resources if this applies to you and may impact your ability to be in compliance by the deadline.

Masks

QUESTION: Will the mask mandate remain in place next semester (Spring 2022)?

ANSWER:

Yes, current CDC guidelines recommend facial coverings even for vaccinated individuals.


 

QUESTION: If everyone is vaccinated, will the mask mandate go away?

ANSWER:

At this time, the current CDC guidelines indicate that facial coverings should be worn indoors by both vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals. If those guidelines are adjusted, we will make adjustments to our protocols.


 

QUESTION: Will there be a certain percentage of vaccinated people on campus where we will do away with the mask mandate?

ANSWER:

At this time, the current CDC guidelines indicate that facial coverings should be worn indoors by both vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals. If those guidelines are adjusted we will make adjustments to our protocols.

NATURAL Antibodies

QUESTION: If natural antibodies only protect you for three months, how can the vaccine protect you longer than that? Aren’t antibodies irrelevant in long term immunity? Is it not true that the true indicator of immunity to any virus is not the presence of antibodies but the development of T cells and B cells which increase with time as antibodies fade? Is it not true that long term immunity is greater due to that cell growth in those that have natural infection rather than vaccinations?

ANSWER:

Thank you to Anthony P. Wetherington MD for answering this question.

Listed below, in order, predicting future protection and also primary immune response versus T cell memory:

  1. Least – Vaccination alone
  2. Middle – Natural infection
  3. Best – Natural infection, plus vaccination

Vaccines help your body create antibodies against the spike protein only. These antibodies peak very quickly, then fade over the course of six to nine months.

Natural infection gives your body an opportunity to create antibodies to all the proteins that make up SARS-Cov-19. These antibodies also fade over time. I’m assuming the “three months” part of the question comes from my statement that people with COVID-19 should be immunized in three months. This initial recommendation came at the beginning of the vaccine rollout to give uninfected people the opportunity to get the vaccine first. Now, infected individuals can get the vaccine at anytime after their illness. Antibodies begin to decline at three months, but should still provide good immunity.

Everyone’s immune systems are different. So, everyone will create a varied immunity response in terms of strength and variety.

As pointed out, immunity memory is very important.


 

QUESTION: I have recently recovered from COVID-19, and should therefore have natural antibodies in my system. Will I still be expected to meet the deadline date this semester or will I have a deadline extension?

ANSWER:

Yes, the CDC advises the vaccine regardless of whether someone has already had COVID-19. Studies have shown that any immunity has waned after 90 days. Those that have had both COVID and received the vaccine are the best protected. In addition, those who were treated with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma should wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccination. Please contact Student Health Services or Human Resources if this applies to you and may impact your ability to be in compliance by the deadline.

Online

QUESTION: Are online students required to be vaccinated?

ANSWER:

Yes.


 

QUESTION: Will online courses be offered as an alternative for those who don’t want the vaccine?

ANSWER:

Not at this time. Wilmington College is not offering online programming.

OTHER

QUESTION: Why does the College control Greek housing that is off campus?

ANSWER:

The opportunity to reside in Greek housing off campus is provided by exemption from the College. When granted the exemption, students understand that they must still abide by campus rules.


 

QUESTION: Why are posts deleted from the Wilmington College Student App?

ANSWER:

Post are monitored for compliance with Wilmington College code of conduct. Those posts that violate the code of conduct will be removed.


 

QUESTION: Does Wilmington College support the right for students to peacefully protest on campus?

ANSWER:

Yes.


QUESTION: Will we be going online after Thanksgiving this year?

ANSWER:

This has not yet been determined. Last year, due to an increase of cases on campus, it was determined we should complete the semester online. We will continue to monitor the situation and will communicate any changes to the campus community.


 

QUESTION: Were fetal cells used in the research process for the COVID-19 vaccines?

ANSWER:

Thank you to Anthony P. Wetherington MD for answering this question.

It is my understanding that while the cells are not used in the actual vaccines, they were used in the research process to test efficacy. No, the COVID-19 vaccines do not contain any aborted fetal cells. However, fetal cell lines – cells grown in a laboratory based on aborted fetal cells collected generations ago – were used in testing during research and development of the mRNA vaccines, and during production of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

There are a number of common medications that also used fetal cell lines during research and development. These include acetaminophen, albuterol, aspirin, ibuprofen, Tylenol, Pepto Bismol, Tums, Lipitor, Senokot, Motrin, Maalox, Ex-Lax, Benadryl, Sudafed, Preparation H, Claritin, Prilosec, and Zoloft.


 

QUESTION: Will treatments currently in experimental trials that are found to be alternatives to the vaccine be acceptable to the College if allowed by the FDA?

ANSWER:

Not at this time, this is being developed as a treatment for someone that has already gotten COVID.


 

QUESTION: What is your response to the petition that is going around?

ANSWER:

We are in an environment where every voice can be heard. The College encourages and respects this, it is healthy and necessary. One reason why we continue to offer webinars and forums is to create an avenue to share these thoughts knowing that some receive the information and comments differently. The petition is a reasonable way for someone to engage.

Policy

QUESTION: Why can’t we just pay a fee like other institutions are offering, rather than requiring the vaccine?

ANSWER:

Vaccination is to reduce severe illness and hospitalization. Those vaccinated are less likely to spread the virus. The College allows both medical and religious exemptions.


 

QUESTION: Is the College going to require that anyone who becomes a member of campus (faculty, staff and students) gets the vaccination/exemption for years to come? If yes, will the College be requiring the booster shot?

ANSWER:

As we have communicated, we are using the guidance from the federal, state and local institutions in determining the protocols for our campus. When guidance changes, we have and will continue to make adjustments to our campus protocols.


 

QUESTION: Why weren’t incoming freshmen (Fall 2021) informed that a vaccine mandate was a possibility before the semester began?

Had Wilmington College made this decision at the beginning of the Fall 2021 semester, it would have been communicated. At the beginning of this academic year, President Trevor shared with campus the current protocols and indicated that we would be reviewing our protocols monthly to determine if any modifications needed to be made.


 

QUESTION: Wasn’t the vaccine approved too quickly?

ANSWER:

The technology for the vaccine was first studied and developed in the 1970s. Although this is a new virus, it belongs to a family of viruses with similar traits. The mRNA vaccine platform has been developed and researched for over 10 years. Once the SARS-CoV-2 virus was sequenced, it only took a few days to make the vaccine candidates. The spike protein genetic code was plugged into preexisting technology. Students should get vaccinated because of potential exposure to others. The need for herd immunity is what will stop the spread of COVID-19.


 

QUESTION: Why do I need to get the vaccine if I’m not the one at risk?

ANSWER:

Students should get vaccinated because of potential exposure to others.  The need for herd immunity is what will stop the spread of COVID-19.


 

QUESTION: Why is Wilmington College requiring the COVID-19 vaccination?

ANSWER:

The Delta variant of the COVID-19 virus has contributed to an increase in cases across the country, Ohio, Clinton County, and on our campus. As of the week of September 13, 2021, we have had 31 students and 7 employees test positive this semester, with others in isolation or quarantine (see COVID-19 Dashboard for current data). Last year at this same time we only had 2 students and 1 employee test positive. Additionally, the vaccine rate among our campus community is below where we hoped to be at this point (Faculty 88% | Staff 72% | Students 35%). Clinton County’s vaccine rate is 42%. Our goal moving forward is for our campus to be fully vaccinated by the Spring 2022 semester to support the health and safety of all.

There is significant evidence that the COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. The FDA granted full approval for the Pfizer vaccine and other vaccines are seeing similar progress. These vaccines can help prevent COVID-19 and prevent severe illness or death.

On September 9, 2021, the federal government issued a mandate for all employers, including private colleges and universities, with over 100 employees to either mandate the COVID-19 vaccine or have weekly testing. Wilmington College already requires a number of other FDA-approved vaccinations for students in order to enroll.

Taking all factors into consideration, including input from the Clinton County Health Department, President Trevor announced that Wilmington College will be requiring all students, faculty (including adjunct), and staff to be fully vaccinated or have an approved exemption prior to the start of the Spring 2022 Semester.

SENIORS

QUESTION: Do seniors with one semester left have to get the vaccine?

ANSWER:

Seniors who will graduate in December 2021 will not be required to get the vaccine.  Seniors enrolled in the Spring 2022 semester will be required to get the vaccine or apply for an exemption.

SHUTDOWN

QUESTION: Is there a number/percentage of students in a given time period testing positive that will likely result in us being sent home early and moving to online?

ANSWER:

No, we would look at a number of factors, one of which would be positive cases on campus in making that determination in discussions with the Clinton County Health Department.


 

QUESTION: Will we be going online after Thanksgiving this year?

ANSWER:

This has not yet been determined. Last year, due to an increase of cases on campus, it was determined we should complete the semester online. We will continue to monitor the situation and will communicate any changes to the campus community.

SIDE EFFECTS & FERTILITY

QUESTION: Does the COVID-19 vaccine cause infertility?

ANSWER:

CDC and Medical Professionals Recommend COVID-19 Vaccination for People Who Want to Have Children.

COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for everyone 12 years of age and older, including people who are trying to get pregnant now or might become pregnant in the future, as well as their partners.

Professional medical organizations serving people of reproductive age, including adolescents, emphasize that there is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccination causes a loss of fertility. These organizations also recommend COVID-19 vaccination for people who may consider getting pregnant in the future.

Professional societies for male reproduction recommend that men who want to have babies in the future be offered COVID-19 vaccination. There is no evidence that vaccines, including COVID-19 vaccines, cause male fertility problems.


 

QUESTION: What compensation does the school offer for adverse reactions from the vaccine being required?

ANSWER:

The Health Resources & Services Administration manages claims and compensation program.


 

QUESTION: Would the College compensate those who have a severe complications from the vaccine?

ANSWER:

The Health Resources & Services Administration manages claims and compensation program.

 

Statistics

QUESTION: What do we know about vaccinated vs. unvaccinated patients in Ohio hospitals? Are those who have other health conditions currently able to quickly and effectively access care in Ohio?

ANSWER:

Thank you to Anthony P. Wetherington MD for answering this question.

I am a hospitalist at Highland Regional where we have 25 beds. On the date of the forum, we had 6 patients with COVID. Two weeks before, half of the total beds were occupied by COVID patients. Ohio is currently (as of Sept. 2021) experiencing the fourth wave and I am hopeful that the recent decrease will continue. 85-90% of patients in the hospital are unvaccinated. About 95% of those on a ventilator are unvaccinated.


 

QUESTION: What is the rate of our students that have been hospitalized?

ANSWER:

We do not share student medical information.


 

QUESTION: Does the College have any comment on Harvard being 95% vaccinated and having to move to online courses due to so many breakthrough cases?

ANSWER:

We are not aware of any Harvard statistics.


 

QUESTION: How many college-age people will die due to COVID?

ANSWER:

There is a 1.6% or less overall death rate for college-age individuals who are healthy with no underlying conditions. The vaccine is not used to reduce death for that group, but so that the number of students out sick and causing disruption to class, being hospitalized, or spreading COVID-19 to someone who is at higher risk is reduced.


 

QUESTION: How many of the positive cases on campus were the Delta variant? How many were vaccinated versus unvaccinated?

ANSWER:

Tests are not specific to the Delta variant. Of the (currently) 46 cases on campus, 6 were vaccinated individuals (see COVID-19 Dashboard for current data).


 

QUESTION: Is the school tracking and making available data about breakthrough cases?

ANSWER:

We do review the vaccination status of those testing positive as it pertains to isolation/quarantine requirements.


 

QUESTION: Are you able to provide independent data regarding the number of COVID-19 cases transmitted by vaccinated versus unvaccinated individuals?

ANSWER:

Please see data compiled by the CDC on breakthrough cases.

As of September 10, 2021, there have been 14,925 deaths, 60,741 hospitalizations, and 80,393 urgent care visits caused by the COVID-19 vaccine. There have been 5,959 cases of anaphylaxis, 8,156 cases of Bell’s Palsy, 1,862 miscarriages, and 6,637 heart attacks. 19,210 people have become permanently disabled, and 28,168 severe allergic reaction. This is just in the United States. These statistics come from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), managed by the CDC and the FDA.

As commented during our webinar by Dr. Holten, the VAERS website allows anyone to report adverse events from any type of vaccine, the CDC and FDA do follow up on the reports of adverse events but do not investigate whether the vaccine actually caused the adverse event.

We have included a link to an interview where Dr. Holten addressed the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Her response is consistent with state and federal information regarding this topic.

We also want to share a direct link to the CDC COVID Data Tracker that will provide perspective in terms of COVID-19 virus related deaths.

As of September 26, 2021, the COVID-19 virus is documented as responsible for over 684,000 COVID-19 virus related deaths in the U.S.

 

Testing

QUESTION: Is it not true that both vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals can transmit the virus?

ANSWER:

In theory, a vaccinated individual would be more of a threat to transmit the virus asymptomatically. Vaccinated individuals are still at very low risk of getting sick. In general, 10% currently get sick, but if a vaccinated person becomes symptomatic, then they should be tested. So the reason not to test vaccinated individuals is because 90% will actually not get sick, so they are not the target group.


 

QUESTION: Why are we requiring exempted individuals to be tested weekly when they are at no greater threat to others than vaccinated individuals?

ANSWER:

In theory, a vaccinated individual would be more of a threat to transmit the virus asymptomatically. Vaccinated individuals are still at very low risk of getting sick. In general, 10% currently get sick, but if a vaccinated person becomes symptomatic, then they should be tested. So the reason not to test vaccinated individuals is because 90% will actually not get sick, so they are not the target group.


 

QUESTION: Is weekly testing an option, even without an exemption?

ANSWER:

No.


 

QUESTION: Will those who receive an exemption still be submitted for weekly testing? If so, is an exemption even necessary? Can’t they just submit to weekly testing?

ANSWER:

No, only those with an approved exemption are eligible for weekly testing.


 

QUESTION: Why not test every student once a week, rather than make every student get vaccinated?

ANSWER:

The goal is to develop herd immunity. To do this, we must have as many people vaccinated as possible.


 

QUESTION: Why are vaccinated people not required to test even though we can get and transmit the virus?

ANSWER:

Vaccinated individuals are still at very low risk of getting sick. In general, 10% currently get sick, but if a vaccinated person becomes symptomatic, then they should be tested. So the reason not to test vaccinated individuals is because 90% will actually not get sick, so they are not the target group.


 

QUESTION: Since we know that vaccinated people can get and spread COVID-19, why would you not test the entire student body every week?

ANSWER:

Vaccinated individuals are still at very low risk of getting sick.  In general, 10% currently get sick, but if a vaccinated person becomes symptomatic, then they should be tested.  So the reason not to test vaccinated individuals is because 90% will actually not get sick, so they are not the target group.


 

QUESTION: Federal mandate also allows for testing once a week for those who don’t get the vaccine why is that not an option for students.

ANSWER:

The College has decided on the vaccine requirement with an exemption for medical or religious reasons. Those that receive approved exemptions are the only ones that will be tested.


 

QUESTION: Will testing for those with exemptions be conducted at WC?

ANSWER:

Yes, the testing will be done on campus.


 

QUESTION: Who will pay for the testing of exempt individuals?

ANSWER:

The College will be providing the testing. Additional details on testing schedules will be provided at a later date.


 

QUESTION: Why can’t we opt to get tested weekly (like athletes) if we don’t want to vaccinate?

ANSWER:

Currently, WC athletes are following testing protocols set by the NCAA and OAC which require testing of unvaccinated individuals. All athletes will fall under the Wilmington College vaccine protocol beginning Spring 2022 semester. Any student or employee that has an approved exemption will be tested weekly.


 

QUESTION: Will you be testing for the Delta variant?

ANSWER:

There is no separate test for the Delta variant. A portion of all tests are sent to the CDC labs for separate analysis.


 

QUESTION: Why is weekly testing not an option in the spring for those who make the personal decision to not be vaccinated?

ANSWER:

The College has decided on the vaccine requirement with an exemption for medical or religious reasons. Those that receive approved exemptions are the only ones that will be tested.


 

QUESTION: Is there an option to be tested on a weekly basis instead of getting the vaccine?

ANSWER:

Only those with approved exemptions will be tested in place of the vaccine.

 

Tuition

QUESTION: Will tuition raise?

ANSWER:

No, the current tuition rates for Spring 2022 are already set and will not be changed.


 

QUESTION: Will tuition go up in 2022?

ANSWER:

No, the current tuition rates for Spring 2022 are already set and will not be changed.


 

QUESTION: Will tuition be increased if a certain number of students leave?

No, the current tuition rates for Spring 2022 are already set and will not be changed.

 

Vaccine

QUESTION: Which vaccines meet the Wilmington College COVID-19 vaccination requirement?

ANSWER:

Any FDA-approved or Emergency Use Authorization COVID-19 vaccine is accepted. Additionally, the World Health Organization Emergency Use Listing vaccines will meet the requirements.


 

QUESTION: What constitutes official proof of vaccination?

ANSWER:

The official documentation (i.e., the vaccination card you received from the provider that administered your vaccine) that shows the accepted vaccine. Proof of vaccination can also be obtained from your state immunization registry or the provider that administered the vaccine.


 

QUESTION: Who do I report my vaccine to?

ANSWER:

Students should upload their vaccination information to their PRIVIT account. Employees should provide a copy of their vaccination documentation to Human Resources.


 

QUESTION: Will the College provide the vaccine on campus?

ANSWER:

Yes, Wilmington College will be providing multiple vaccines on campus for faculty, staff and students during the months of October 2021, November 2021 and December 2021.


QUESTION: Will there be a requirement for a booster shot?

ANSWER:

Wilmington College will be consulting with the Clinton County Health Department along with other state and federal information to determine requirements for booster shots. This information will be provided to campus when it becomes available.


 

QUESTION: If the vaccine works, why do unvaccinated people need to get the vaccine?

ANSWER:

The vaccine is not designed to cure COVID-19. It is designed to lessen and mitigate the illness associated with it. Vaccinated individuals can still be infected, however, current statistics indicate that the symptoms are milder and less transmissive to others.


 

QUESTION: If the school is requiring this vaccine, can liability forms be drawn up and signed by the school stating that Wilmington is liable since this is their choice and the student has no choice if not exempted?

ANSWER:

The College currently requires a series of immunization records to be on file prior to enrollment. The COVID-19 vaccine has been added to list of immunization record requirements to be on file prior to enrollment. If you or any member of the community has a medical reason that might pre-dispose you to complications with any immunization requirement, the option to apply for an exemption is available. Requirements for immunizations to attend are a traditional part of enrollment expectations that are the prerogative of any public or private institution of higher education.