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College Names Erika Goodwin as Academics VP

1995 WC Graduate Has Held Positions on Faculty or Administration for 18 Years

April 10, 2013

Erika Goodwin is pictured with her athletic training research class from spring 2012. This year, the Ohio Athletic Trainers Association selected 16 of her students to present their research at OATA's Research Symposium in May. WC students have earned the symposium's

Erika Goodwin is pictured with her athletic training research class from spring 2012. This year, the Ohio Athletic Trainers Association selected 16 of her students to present their research at OATA's Research Symposium in May. WC students have earned the symposium's "Exceptional Research" award seven the of the past eight years.

Wilmington College selected Erika Smith Goodwin to serve as vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty following a national search.

Goodwin, a native of Clinton County, is no stranger to the College as she is a 1995 graduate in athletic training/sports medicine and has been a full-time member of the faculty or administrative staff since 2000.

Indeed, the College named her as interim vice president in summer 2011 when WC President Jim Reynolds moved from the academic vice presidency to the president’s office.

Reynolds said the opportunity to work with Goodwin, albeit on an interim basis, provided great insight into her talents, skills and demeanor in that senior administrative capacity. While the VP search brought in “outstanding candidates,” the president noted that, as the process evolved, Goodwin “emerged as the best candidate” for the College at this time.

“Erika accomplished many good things during the past 18 months as we continue to work towards providing our students with the very best education that we can,” he said, noting that Goodwin’s selection coincided with the College’s sense of urgency for progress and the need for continuity of leadership.

“The College community congratulates Erika as she begins this next chapter in her long service to Wilmington College,” Reynolds said.

Following Goodwin’s graduation from WC, the College asked her to utilize her experience with horses to teach part-time in its fledgling equine science program from 1995 to 1999. Concurrently, she also taught in the athletic training program while studying for her Master of Arts degree with concentrations in athletic training and human gross anatomy, which she earned from Wright State University in 1998.

(LEFT) Erika Goodwin

Goodwin joined the athletic training faculty full time in 2000, eventually becoming a tenured, full professor while earning her Ph.D. in higher education administration and athletic training from Union Institute and University in 2006.

She served as head athletic trainer before holding the academic leadership roles of area coordinator and coordinator of athletic training clinical education for three years beginning in 2005.

She was named associate dean for academic affairs in 2008 and promoted to associate vice president before being appointed to serve as interim vice president.

Goodwin believes her selection “attests to the trust” Reynolds has in her abilities.

“I have worked closely now with Jim for almost five years and I think we are a very good team,” she said. “We both want to see WC flourish and grow.

“Jim has brought new leadership and vision to the College and it is my job as the vice president to build upon his vision with my own strategic plans for the academic affairs division.”

Goodwin alluded to a number of progressive changes already being enacted.

Next year, the College will move to a four credit hour system and begin a new general education curriculum that utilizes infused skills.

“These two changes will allow students to take fewer courses during a semester yet go into more depth with each course,” she said, adding that the infused skills (oral communication, information literacy, critical thinking, writing and quantitative skills) are ones that employers report nationally are lacking in recent college graduates.

“These ‘soft skills,’ as they are called, are a critical piece to education that our faculty and administration believe are essential — I wholeheartedly agree,” she said.

Next year the College also will start new majors in political science and special education, and a sustainable agriculture minor. New faculty hires are planned in English, sport management, special education and mathematics.

Goodwin also reflects the campus’ excitement about the recently announced renovation/expansion of Kettering Hall for agriculture and the sciences, as well as plans for other capital projects.

“I think there are many good things in store for the College,” she said, noting that her own personal evolution is a testament to the “truly transformative” experience Wilmington offers its students.

“WC has a way of bringing out the best in you, in helping you find more within you than you thought you had,” she said. “For a girl that grew up on a horse farm right outside of Port William here in Clinton County, there is not any other place I'd rather be.

“Wilmington College is my alma mater and Wilmington is my hometown. I have such a passion for this place.”

Goodwin and her husband, Brad, a 1998 WC alumnus, reside in Wilmington with their two daughters, Emily and Gracie.