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Beacon Gives Athletic Training Students 'One of a Kind Experience'

Students Instructed in Hands-on Arthroscopic Surgery on Human Cadaver

April 23, 2013

Wilmington College athletic training students observe and participate in arthroscopic and dissection procedures on a human medical cadaver during a recent visit to Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. (Photo courtesy of Beacon)

Wilmington College athletic training students observe and participate in arthroscopic and dissection procedures on a human medical cadaver during a recent visit to Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. (Photo courtesy of Beacon)

When 15, senior athletic training majors traveled to Cincinnati recently for a tour of Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, they expected to see its 70,000 square-foot Summit Woods center designed for and dedicated to the athlete.

They expected to walk through the state-of-the-art facility that features such services as clinic, physical therapy, surgery, imaging, massage therapy and chiropractic care, as well as its on-site affiliates, D1 Sports Training and Drayer Physical Therapy Institute.

They expected to see the hundreds of autographed photos of Cincinnati Reds and other impressive pieces of sports memorabilia on the walls.

Indeed, they viewed all that — and it was impressive — but what they were allowed to do that day under the auspices of the Beacon Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation was in Jennifer Walker’s words, “remarkable.”

The students in Walker’s Issues in Sports Medicine class donned surgical gowns and masks had the opportunity to visit Beacon’s “learning labs,” where they were instructed in hands-on arthroscopic surgery on two cadaver shoulders.

“You see injuries but you don’t appreciate the anatomy until you actually see it,” said Walker, assistant professor of athletic training. “Our students actually used the arthroscopic equipment associated with minimally invasive procedures.”

From there, they dissected two additional cadavers from the shoulders to the fingers.

“This was an exceptional opportunity, a one of a kind experience,” she added, noting they worked under the supervision of surgeons Dr. Bradley Dyrstad and Dr. Michael Myers.

Dr. Tim Kremchek, one of Beacon’s founding physicians and the Cincinnati Reds’ medical director, navigated the group through the two-hour learning lab.

“This was a very unique experience, but I feel an important one for our students,” Kremchek said, noting that orthopaedic sports doctors work closely with athletic training professionals.

“We work together as a team and the more the students know and the more they can experience will make our teamwork better for the athletes in our care.”

Kremchek praised the partnership between Beacon and the College that was initiated about a year ago in which the sports medicine provider serves the medical needs of the College’s student-athletes.

“We at Beacon are privileged to be able to be associated with Wilmington College, which I consider as one of the finest athletic training schools and programs in the country,” he said. “The (learning lab opportunity) was valuable to both of us and I hope will be a springboard for more of the same in the future.”